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20120929
20120929
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> let me ask you about your life since 1975 first. when did you come to the united states? under what circumstances? >> i came first to. why? i stay as a refugee, like other vietnamese refugees. i stayed in camp pendleton for two months. >> california. >> yeah, in california. and then after that, i joined my family here in fair tax, virginia. so we live here for one year. and then one day i was invited by television, you know, showdown l.a., los angeles. so while in l.a., i met with some vietnamese friend. and then they convinced me that california have a better climate and whatever for me. so we decide to move down there in 1 1976. >> where do you live? >> well, we move around. first, we bought a house in huntington beach. with the money i make from the book. and from the speaking tour. i remember it was only $110,000 at that time, four-bedroom, nice house. i only had to put 10%, $12,000. and then i left huntington beach and then go to live in hong kong for almost three years. >> what years were those? >> 1988 to 1991. and then when i come back to america, we go to seattle for one ye
also know that they called for the revenge against the united states for a killing by a terrorist by a drone attack. they had ample warning. did they fall down on the job? >> it seems like there were a number of cascade go failures. it's fair to say it was probably a serious mistake for the ambassador stevens to go to benghazi. it was a serious mistake for them to have a marine detachment at our facility in benghazi. i'll say this for stevens. he was a brave guy. he was involved in a transition and wanted to be involved in the transition for building a new libya. you have to take some kind of risks like that. >> there is no question about that. but people knew that libya was a terrorist center. almost all of our facilities is secured by marine guards. it would be strange marine guards guarding bahamas but not in tripoli. >> so why did the administration go to the story. it was all about the video reaction in the muslim world -- let's face it an obscure youtube video that nobody knew about until after the riot started? >> i think the key question. i don't know why they went to that
to welcome to distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of the united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitutional accountable lee center. thanks for the opportunity to collaborate with you. the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence for nation had, the constitution did not get as much attention. not as stirring as the declaration, and it's for parchment pages to the declarations single sheet deter most casual readers. the lack of celebration or to its image. over the years it was exposed to sunlight and smoke but the constitution was never exhibited . when you view both the original documents upstairs in the rotunda you immediately see the difference. the declaration stated to the point of eligibility while the constitution which nearly as fresh as it did when describe presented it to the continental convention -- constitutional convention. celebrating constitution day on september 17th has been a longstanding tradition here of the national arch
of the united states? which is that this country has become ungovernable. its politics are poisonous. miami dade colleges the biggest in the nation. 175,000 students. all of them called on the streets in this massive voter registration drive which comes at the end of months of court battles over access. what i need you need? how far in advance can you do it? poorer voters are less likely to get to the polls on time. folks think florida republicans are fighting dirty. >> the efforts have come from republicans. in essence, you have the fact of suppressing the vote. >> that is what you see the purpose is? >> exactly. >> that is a fundamental issue at the heart of american democracy. if you think people are trying to stop their opponent's voting. >> extremely self. especially when the people that are registered to vote are with a red -- organization like ours. they are normally minorities. by stopping third party organizations from registering, you're stopping minorities from registering. >> on the other side of the fence, they seem equally bitter. the conservative talk radio station caters to an au
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
public schools here in san francisco, throughout the state of california and throughout the united states. as all of you undoubtedly know. with that being said, it's vitally important that those parents still have a say in the education of their children. i would certainly support and promote voting by those parents in school board elections in san francisco. by implication own a community college election would fit in that rubric, to support college advancement to people who have traditionally been put at the margins of our society. in those two elections, i think, are the most fundamental in the sense that they go to the root of advancement in this country and the obtaining of the american dream. so the school board and community college board i would certainly support that. >> thank you, miss olague. >> i don't think there is much to add to that. i know a couple of years ago there was a ballot measure that failed. so i would totally support bringing this back and allowing people to reconsider it. because as mr. everett said, i think it is important for people, especially those who h
and go. >> reporter: if the united states hasn't won the heart and mind of this 15-year-old, what about the rest of afghans? >> richard, the fact that a generation is now coming of age post-taliban, is that in itself the best defense of the taliban coming back into power, folks who would stand firm? >> maybe not. the taliban is an armed group. these schoolgirls are not going to fight against the taliban. they are all very worried about what is going to happen in this country. and we've spoken to politicians, political analysts, and they think after these troops leave that there could be a civil war in this country, and many afghans now don't remember 9/11. they just remember ten years of war. and they're asking themselves why? why did this happen? why did we have to have all of this war for ten years? >> 300,000 afghan troops, local police, national police have been trained. the strategy to get these folks home is to turn it over to afghan troops. questions about readiness and supplies and that sort of thing. but are they fighting an enemy who has an organization -- are the taliban frag
to mitt romney recently on the campaign trail. >> he's president of the united states, he's a very effective speaker. >> he's a very eloquent speaker, and so i'm sure in the debates, as last time in his debates with senator mccain, he'll be very eloquent. >> it's not only mitt romney and his campaign playing the game. so is the obama campaign. >> what history tells us, that challengers normally win the first debate. just by the fact that they're standing on the stage with the president. that elevates them, and they normally come into these things as underdogs. we're coming into this debate very realistic. mitt romney is likely to win if he plays his cards right. >> making those comments on piers morgan. what's the idea, try to bring down your candidate, lower the bar, so if your candidate does better, it's considered a big victory. how much are americans paying attention to that? what they want to hear is what they'll do to make the country better. >> thanks so much, paul. the first presidential debate starting wednesday night, october 3rd. watch it live at 7:00 eastern time right
. author of the amateur joins us. and karl rove among our guest next week. lou: united nations on a mission to become the tax master. considering new global taxes to transfer trillions of dollars. among the tax proposed remember secretary of state clinton is enthusiastic. one% tax on all billionaires' and all financial transactions carbon emissions, airline tickets she suggests she is on board with some of that earlier this week. >> one issue i have been preaching about is collecting taxes in the equitable man o' war -- manner especially around the world from the e.u. the of every country are making money. there are rich people everywhere yet to they3 there are rich people everywhere yet to they do not contribute to the growth of their own country. lou: there are rich people everywhere. she is worth over 100 million. what is she thinking about? and just have to give them our national sovereignty? what an absurd concept. we are ready to contribute 22% of the when budget almost $8 billion to the united nations. our favorite angry liberal on a quest to offend more people. taking shots at almos
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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